My monthly e-newsletter, The Throwback, is filled with history stories that will make you say “Wait? What?” Click here to read this month’s edition, in which I discuss the legacies of Andrew Carnegie and Napoleon Bonaparte, the buddy-buddy road trips of Henry Ford and Thomas Edison, the first impeachment of an American president, and a…

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Fourteen tons of fireworks illuminated the New York night on May 24, 1883, to celebrate the completion of one of the greatest engineering feats of the Gilded Age—the Brooklyn Bridge. Billed as the “Eighth Wonder of the World,” the longest suspension bridge ever built at the time spanned the East River to link the twin…

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My monthly e-newsletter, The Throwback, is filled with history stories that will make you say “Wait? What?” Click here to read this month’s edition, in which I discuss the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission and the first men on the moon, including links to stories on how a virtual lighting model debunks conspiracy…

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Great to see the Wall Street Journal publish a review of WHEN THE IRISH INVADED CANADA on page A15 in the June 17, 2019, print edition. “Mr. Klein is keen to celebrate the idealistic Fenians with their audacious dreams of national liberation, but he doesn’t fail to catalog the foolhardiness of their endeavors. His book…

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A little more than 24 hours after leading an invasion of Canada with an Irish-American army, John O’Neill could see the enemy approaching. From his perch atop a limestone ridge outside the village of Ridgeway, Ontario, O’Neill could see an army three times the size of his marching in their direction. Although outnumbered, O’Neill’s Fenian…

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Thirteen months after Robert E. Lee laid down his sword at Appomattox Court House, former Confederate rebels slipped on their gray wool jackets. Union veterans longing to emancipate an oppressed people donned their blue kepis. Battle-hardened warriors from both the North and the South returned to the front lines, but not to reignite the Civil…

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With the golden sunlight glimmering on their bayonets and the soft Vermont breezes tickling their green silk battle flag, the self-proclaimed Irish Republican Army marched off to war on the morning of May 25, 1870. Stopping on a country road outside a brick farmhouse just yards from his intended target, General John O’Neill ordered his…

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My monthly e-newsletter, The Throwback, is filled with history stories that will make you say “Wait? What?” Click here to read this month’s edition, in which I discuss the early dominance of African-American jockeys at the Kentucky Derby, Conan O’Brien’s obsession with biographer Robert Caro, and the time Donald Trump foreshadowed his border wall payment…

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Ever hear that story of Wilmer McLean? It was said the Civil War started in his front yard and ended in his front parlor. He abandoned his house after it was damaged in the Battle of Bull Run and moved to quieter pastures–in Appomattox–only to find his front parlor taken over in April 1865 so…

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